Lana Daya 01
Making a Home

The Art
of Wovens

Words by Lucy Siddall

The inseparable relationship between humans
and nature with Lana Daya.

Lana Daya, an ethically crafted textile brand based in Indonesia, is committed to honouring the country’s traditions and the craftsmanship of indigenous fabric production.

Founders Clarissa Nilistiani and Theresya Tan want the textile industry to stay connected to its human roots. A digitalised industry disconnects us from the art of woven production and distracts from the region’s historical practices. Without forgetting the heritage of Indonesia’s textile industry, Lana Daya seeks to marry traditional textile production with technological progression, collaborating closely with regional makers and working to promote and sustain a rural economy.

Lana Daya has an unwavering commitment to nature as the origin of production and manufacture materials rooted in tradition. As a result, 80-85% of the brand’s products are made from unconventional, often raw or unprocessed fabrics using hand-operated traditional weaving machines. According to Clarissa, this is the beauty of the technique. Natural yarns like this are often thick or difficult to manipulate, meaning they are not suited to modern weaving machines. With older, human-operated machinery, you have to use your hands, which gives the maker more control of the fabric and greater flexibility in the outcome. There is an artistic freedom that comes from hand-made production.

Raw yarns, however, have a different aesthetic and finish than synthetic fibres, and the founders know educating their customers is crucial in promoting the use of natural materials in home goods. There will often be irregularities in the finished pieces or slight variations from product to product, making the brand and the pieces it produces so unique.

“There is an artistic freedom
that comes from hand-made
production.“ – Clarissa Nilistiani

Yet, far from being seen as a saviour to local makers, Lana Daya prides itself on its collaborative relationship with weaving houses and its desire to honour and nurture indigenous Indonesian practices. The brand works with the strengths of each weaving house, prioritising its skills over Lana Daya’s aesthetic demands. Understanding certain weaving houses’ need to produce plain fabric led to innovative design solutions such as using plain materials as linings or working with embroidery, embellishment or printing. This shift in thinking has resulted in an optimal way of working for small factories and an imaginative approach to designing for Clarissa and Theresya.

What started as a curiosity about the sustainability of ancient weaving techniques has grown into a thriving global business with houses, showrooms and interior designers eager to showcase and own the brand in their workplaces and homes. The brand now uses its online presence to educate its customers on historic production practices, which is met enthusiastically by followers. Interest in weaving led the founders to run a workshop for those interested in learning traditional techniques—a promising step in encouraging younger generations into traditional making industries and keeping the historical methods alive.

Yet, far from being seen as a saviour to local makers, Lana Daya prides itself on its collaborative relationship with weaving houses and its desire to honour and nurture indigenous Indonesian practices. The brand works with the strengths of each weaving house, prioritising its skills over Lana Daya’s aesthetic demands. Understanding certain weaving houses’ need to produce plain fabric led to innovative design solutions such as using plain materials as linings or working with embroidery, embellishment or printing. This shift in thinking has resulted in an optimal way of working for small factories and an imaginative approach to designing for Clarissa and Theresya.

What started as a curiosity about the sustainability of ancient weaving techniques has grown into a thriving global business with houses, showrooms and interior designers eager to showcase and own the brand in their workplaces and homes. The brand now uses its online presence to educate its customers on historic production practices, which is met enthusiastically by followers. Interest in weaving led the founders to run a workshop for those interested in learning traditional techniques—a promising step in encouraging younger generations into traditional making industries and keeping the historical methods alive.

Clarissa and Theresya encourage their clients to have meaningful textiles in their homes. Wovens and fabrics that both reflect the owner and their story and are aesthetically pleasing. The pair think it’s crucial to consider how the items selected in a home convey the owner’s personality and character.

Clarissa suggests fabrics bring a ‘warm energy’ to a space and make a home inviting. Without them, a room can feel cold. But she enthuses readers to believe in what they love and shop according to personal tastes, not trends. Choose one or two meaningful pieces but be selective and avoid overcrowding a room. You might select a piece for its interesting texture or a specific colour. Identify one or two focal elements, then style the room around those pieces for a considered and elevated look.

Working closely with its artisan partners Lana Daya is keeping Indonesia’s cultural heritage alive. Nurturing nature to create products that allow traditional practices to flourish and keep textiles close to humans. Introducing the world to the ‘humble beauty of handcrafted textiles’ and honouring artistic traditions that, without committed brands like themselves, may not have the platform to survive.

Visit lanadaya.com to shop the beautiful collection.

Lana Daya Linen Detail
Share